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37 CS:GO coaches have been banned for using a spectator bug

Exactly 37 esports coaches are facing sanctions for allegedly using a spectator bug in CS:GO to gain a bird's-eye view of a map during competitive play, giving them and their team an unfair advantage. The esports watchdog association that issued the sanctions posted findings from an on-going investigation spelling out who has been implicated, and how long they'll be banned. In an additional document provided with the report, The Esports Integrity Commission (ESIC) explains how it determined the length. The ESIC assigned each offending party demerit points based on what the watchdog found during its investigation. After the ESIC dished out those points, sanction tiers were then developed to "ensure a proportionate and reasonable level of penalty could be applied consistently across various offenders". The highest tier of the ban period is 36 months, whereas the lowest tier is five. Other factors additionally influenced the bans given out. For example, if someone confessed to using the spectator bug before the investigation, their ban would have been reduced by 40%. If someone assisted in the investigation, they would have seen their ban knocked down by 20%. Read the rest of the story... RELATED LINKS: CS:GO console commands, launch options, and configs ESL announces CS:GO 2021 events calendar, big Pro Tour format changes, more This fan-made CS:GO map lets you tackle Wingman mode in a London Tube station


FaZe backs CS:GO coach RobbaN after spectator bug ban

The Esports Integrity Commission confirmed yesterday that 37 coaches would receive bans for abusing the infamous spectator bug in CS:GO tournaments. However, some coaches aren't too happy with the bans that they've been served. One such coach is FaZe coach Robert 'RobbaN' Dahlström, who was charged with a five and a half month ban but maintains his innocence. He wrote about his experiences with the bug in a Twitlonger, saying that in the first instance he encountered it, he was very confused but made what he believed to be the "honorable decision" and muted his microphone for the rest of the game. FaZe lost that game 16-1. When he encountered the bug a second time, RobbaN realised there might be something seriously wrong and it could be happening more often to other teams. This time, he notified a tournament admin, and together they rectified the view. In the ESIC investigation, RobbaN was only charged for abusing the bug in one match, meaning the commission found his decision to bring in the tournament admin sufficient proof of his innocence this time around. Read the rest of the story... RELATED LINKS: ESIC takes aim at stream snipers in official CS:GO matches ForZe challenges lmbt's CS:GO coaching ban 37 CS:GO coaches banned for exploiting infamous coach spectator bug


ESIC takes aim at stream snipers in official CS:GO matches

The Esports Integrity Commission (ESIC) has dominated the headlines this week after 37 CS:GO coaches were banned for abusing a spectator bug. With bans spanning from three months to three years and coaches taking varying stances on the ruling, the referees of the esports world are moving on to stream snipers. Now, this won't impact regular players who are trying to get matched with and take out the biggest streamers - this investigation is only related to official CS:GO tournaments; specifically competitors tuning into official tournament streams to gain an advantage. This isn't like sneaking a peek at your mate's homework in school - it's like if Andy Murray gained the power to time travel and used it to figure out precisely where Roger Federer would serve the ball before each shot. "It's something that's really emerged in this COVID period," explains Ian Smith, integrity commissioner at ESIC on the HLTV Confirmed show. "We got some reports, perfectly substantiated reports of stream sniping." Read the rest of the story... RELATED LINKS: FaZe backs CS:GO coach RobbaN after spectator bug ban ForZe challenges lmbt's CS:GO coaching ban 37 CS:GO coaches banned for exploiting infamous coach spectator bug


37 CS:GO coaches have been banned for abusing the Spectator bug

37 CS:GO coaches have been banned for abusing the Spectator bug 37 CS:GO coaches have been banned for abusing the Spectator bug Over the past month, multiple CS:GO coaches have been suspended for exploiting a Spectator bug that gave them an unfair advantage, allowing them a birds-eye view of portions of the map they wouldn't usually be able to see. The ESIC (Esports Integrity Commission) announced that matches from official ESL and DreamHack tournaments were analysed. Initially this resulted in bans for three coaches: MIBR's Ricardo "dead" Sinigaglia, Heroic's Nicolai "HUNDEN" Petersen, and Hard Legion's Aleksandr "MechanoGun" Bogatiryev. The ESIC has now announced that it's issued sanctions against 37 coaches for using the glitch. So far, the commission has checked roughly 20 percent of the total demos available for review. However, they claim that the demos they've reviewed so far "likely comprise the most substantial cases of abuse". Each offender has been assigned 'demerit points' that correspond to a specific sanction tier, which then outlines the duration of the ban. This standardises the sanctions to ensure that each person receives a fair penalty. Here are the sanctioning tiers and ban periods: Tier 1 (Aggravated) (eight points): 36 months Tier 1 Sanction (six to seven points): 18 months Tier 2 Sanction (three to five points): 10 months Tier 3 Sanction (fewer than three points): 5 months Those who came forward and admitted to exploiting the bug in advance may see their ban period reduced, and individuals can appeal if they want to contest their suspensions. The ESIC has also outlined that they couldn't be sure "whether the teams related to the offending parties were complicit in the exploitation of the Spectator Bug at the time that the offences took place". For now, here's the full list of the 37 coaches that have been banned, the team they're from, and how long each suspension will last: Twista—iGame.com: 15.75 months casle—maquinas: 10 months Dinamito—Furious Gaming: 10 months ArnoZ1K4—Evidence: 10 months Rejin—Tricked: 19.8 months glouDH—Freestyle: 10 months prd—Neverest: 10 months nook—QB Fire: 7.5 months rikz—DETONA: 10 months Apoka—Luminosity/INTZ/BOOM: 5.4 months MechanoGun—Hard Legion: 36 months Hellpopovich—9z: 10 months fuRy^—DreamEaters: 7.5 months Solaar—Syman/k23: 10 months HUNDEN—Heroic: 8 months dead—SK Gaming/MIBR: 6.5 months guerri—FURIA: 4 months pita—Ninjas in Pyjamas: 10 months AKIMOV—Hard Legion: 7.5 months F_1N—Gambit Youngsters: 8.75 months ellllll—Imperial/paiN: 10 months peu—W7M: 5 months RobbaN—FaZe Clan: 5.5 months Loord—Team Kinguin/Aristocracy: 6 months ToH1o—ex-Outlaws/Windigo Gaming: 10 months Andi—NAVI: 10 months pepik—eSuba: 10 months B1GGY—Heretics: 7.5 months chrille—Epsilon/Red Reserve: 10 months starix—NAVI: 10 months ave—North: 6 months rosey—Nordavind: 10 months LMBT_R—Hellraisers/forZe: 7.5 months FeTiSh—Heroic: 3.75 months miNIr0x—AGO: 3.75 months pNshr—SKADE: 3.75 months ruggah—Dignitas: 3.75 months The investigation also revealed that the Spectator Bug had previously been reported to admins in non-ESIC member tournaments as early as 2017, but the ESIC has stated that they were "not aware of how these reports were treated by non-members as we do not have operational visibility of any actions that were taken. Accordingly, ESIC will not make any comment relating to prior reports of the Spectator Bug to tournament admins by individuals." Thanks, Dexerto.


ForZe challenges lmbt's CS:GO coaching ban

It has already been a day of reckoning for the Counter-Strike: Global Offensive community. The Esports Integrity Commission revealed earlier today it was issuing bans to 37 coaches for abusing the now infamous coach spectator bug, but not everyone is happy about it - in fact, forZe eSports is already challenging the findings. Following the release of the report, in which assistant coach Sergey 'Imbt' Bezhanov was named, the Russian esports organisation has leapt to his defence. Despite being banned for seven and a half months for apparently abusing the bug in three separate cases (two against MiBR and one against Nordavind), forZe isn't happy with the investigation. According to the organisation, the assistant coach was in the Maincast analytics studio for the the MiBR match and couldn't abuse the bug by providing information to players. In the Nordavind match, lmbt apparently reported this to ESIC himself and did not pass on any information to his players. Read the rest of the story... RELATED LINKS: FaZe backs CS:GO coach RobbaN after spectator bug ban ESIC takes aim at stream snipers in official CS:GO matches 37 CS:GO coaches banned for exploiting infamous coach spectator bug


37 CS:GO coaches banned for exploiting infamous coach spectator bug

The Esports Integrity Commission (ESIC) has sanctioned 37 coaches who abused a Spectator Bug in official tournaments. The bug allowed coaches to take a number of steps to become a spectator anywhere on the map - and then they could relay information to their team about enemy locations. ESIC has examined 20% of the available data thus far and given sanctions based on the "frequency" and "duration" of bug abuse. This is an impressive feat, as the complete dataset comprised of 99,650 demos, an astonishing 15.2TB of data. However, the commission is keen to point out that only 0.1% of cases so far have returned positive results. At present, ESIC has banned 37 coaches for periods between 3.75 and 36 months, the longest ban handed to Aleksandr 'MechanoGun' 'zoneR' Bogatiryev for 16 counts of bug exploitation with his team Hard Legion. As well as the ban, many coaches including zoneR have been fired by their teams. However, zoneR's replacement at Hard Legion Sergey 'starix' Ischuk has also been issued a ban, his for 10 months. Read the rest of the story... RELATED LINKS: FaZe backs CS:GO coach RobbaN after spectator bug ban ESIC takes aim at stream snipers in official CS:GO matches ForZe challenges lmbt's CS:GO coaching ban


CS:GO console commands, launch options, and configs

What are the most useful CS:GO console commands? Like with many of Valve's other games, Counter-Strike: Global Offensive can exploit the power of the Source engine console to give you more options and better settings. It's just as important for improving at the game as knowing where to aim guns and grenades - plus, it can even make practising that much easier and more efficient. Being a Steam game, CS:GO also has launch options that can be configured to customise elements before you're even loaded in. All Counter-Strike: Global Offensive veterans will tell you that matches of skilled players can be won and lost on the smallest of margins. A smoke grenade lobbed an inch to the left of the optimum location can reveal your push to the enemy team, for instance. Ensure you have all the knowledge you need to win with the best CS:GO console commands. Below we'll break down all the best console commands and launch options, and even recommend what you should change in your config files to give you the biggest advantage possible. If you're a new player, you might want to check out our CS:GO tips before heading into the console, to help you get a leg up in Valve's deceptively complex FPS. Read the rest of the story... RELATED LINKS: ESL announces CS:GO 2021 events calendar, big Pro Tour format changes, more This fan-made CS:GO map lets you tackle Wingman mode in a London Tube station The story of Counter-Strike's de_dust2_long, as told by its creator


ESL announces CS:GO 2021 events calendar, big Pro Tour format changes, more

The ESL has announced some big changes headed to Counter-Strike: Global Offensive's competitive scene next year, along with a full reveal of its events calendar, as it hopes to "bring some stability back" for players, fans, and the organisation itself. These changes include an all-new format for ESL Pro Tour events, a shiny new studio "designed for CS:GO", and more. "Following one of the most unpredictable and challenging years in esports history, we'd like to reveal our vision and outlook for ESL Pro Tour 2021," the ESL announces on its site. "By announcing our calendar for the upcoming events next year we wish to bring some stability back for the players, fans and ourselves. We hope that LAN events will return and we will continue to monitor the COVID-19 situation leading into 2021." The first of these major updates is the official CS:GO 2021 calendar itself, which next year will feature a "lower density of matches" - that is, eight ESL Pro Tour LAN tournaments, which will be "held over the course of two back-to-back weekends", instead of over a single week. Read the rest of the story... RELATED LINKS: This fan-made CS:GO map lets you tackle Wingman mode in a London Tube station The story of Counter-Strike's de_dust2_long, as told by its creator The best sniper games on PC


This fan-made CS:GO map lets you tackle Wingman mode in a London Tube station

Alongside the main game, Counter-Strike: Global Offensive has a pretty active custom map creator community - and one new, particularly impressive fan-made map lets you hare around a (fictional) London Underground train station. The map, titled 'Oyster' - presumably after the travel card - is for the FPS game's 2v2 Wingman mode, and sees you battle it out in an "under construction" Tube station, Aldham East. The map was made for the recent Source Engine Discord Wingman mapping competition, creator and level designer Sol Williams explains in a press release. As you can see in the cinematic showcase clip of the map below, while the station itself is fictional, it's hugely faithful to the look and feel of London's underground network of tube stations, from its advert-covered white tiled corridors to the signs, escalators, and - heck! - even its litter bins. "Fifteen stories beneath the streets, within the thick concrete of an under-construction station," the trailer says, "an organised eastern European agent is to attempt an attack", in order to destroy a bunch of historical artefacts hidden underneath the station's floor. Read the rest of the story... RELATED LINKS: The story of Counter-Strike's de_dust2_long, as told by its creator The best sniper games on PC CS:GO will hold its first LAN tournament in six months in December


The story of Counter-Strike's de_dust2_long, as told by its creator

In late August, a Twitter user asked their followers if they had any achievements that were completely inconsequential, but which they held dear nonetheless. One reply stood out. "Back in 2005, I came up with a rough modification of an already existing Counter-Strike 1.6 map, which became popular worldwide and it's still being played to this day," Ramiro Olivencia, of Santa Fe, Argentina, tweeted. "It's called de_dust2_largo." Searching for Counter-Strike 1.6 servers in Argentina in the mid-2000s always yielded similar results. Dozens of players gathered in room after virtual room, playing the same map until sunrise. It wasn't the famous Dust2, but rather a modification of it that went on to carve out its own place in history, known in the rest of the world as 'de_dust2_long'. But no one knew who to give credit to until Olivencia tweeted about it. He never acknowledged how successful his creation had been, both inside and outside South America. 15 years later, the reaction to his revelation still leaves him shocked to the core. Read the rest of the story... RELATED LINKS: This fan-made CS:GO map lets you tackle Wingman mode in a London Tube station The best sniper games on PC CS:GO will hold its first LAN tournament in six months in December


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